Issue Information

Free Access

Issue Information

  • Pages: 1447-1448
  • First Published: 15 January 2024

SPECIAL SECTION: NATIVE LAMPREYS: RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION OF ANCIENT FISHES

Bringing partners together: A symposium on native lampreys and the Pacific Lamprey Conservation Initiative

  • Pages: 1449-1457
  • First Published: 15 January 2024

Impact statement

A symposium at the 2022 American Fisheries Society meeting highlighted collaborations among biologists, policymakers, and Native American tribes addressing conservation for native lampreys. We present key findings from the symposium and related research and an example of grassroots effort to protect and restore Pacific Lamprey.

Open Access

Patterns in distribution and density of larval lampreys in the main-stem Columbia River, Washington–Oregon

  • Pages: 1458-1474
  • First Published: 20 November 2023

Impact statement

This research demonstrated that the main-stem river habitats provide year-round rearing for lampreys and tributary river mouth habitats are of particular importance. Understanding changes in seasonal and annual shifts in populations could inform management and conservation actions for lampreys in large rivers systems.

Synthesis of larval lamprey responses to dewatering: State of the science, critical uncertainties, and management implications: Native Lampreys: Research and Conservation of Ancient Fishes

  • Pages: 1475-1491
  • First Published: 17 June 2023

Impact statement

Larval lampreys live burrowed in fine sediments and are often not considered during instream projects that dewater these habitats. This paper synthesizes what is known about lamprey responses to dewatering to provide updated, science-based guidance on dewatering approaches to minimize negative impacts to lamprey and support conservation efforts.

Pacific Lamprey and Western River Lamprey marine ecology: Insight from new ocean collections

  • Pages: 1492-1510
  • First Published: 25 July 2023

Impact statement

We show that native Pacific Lamprey are widespread in marine waters along the U.S. West Coast. They are caught as bycatch in Pacific Hake and other commercial fisheries, requiring development of methods to ensure that Pacific Lamprey released from fisheries survive to ensure the continued existence of this ancient fish.

Open Access

Lampreys in California (Lampetra spp.  and Entosphenus spp.): Mitochondrial phylogenetic analysis reveals previously unrecognized lamprey diversity

  • Pages: 1511-1530
  • First Published: 30 September 2023

Impact statement

Lampreys are ecologically and culturally significant. Populations are thought to be declining across the west coast of North America, but a lack of research impedes monitoring and conservation of lampreys in California. This study investigated lampreys in California using DNA sequences and found more diversity than expected. By determining how many genetically different types of lampreys are present and where these various lampreys are found across the study area, this research paves the way for conservation and protection of lampreys and the numerous benefits they contribute.

Open Access

The return of the adult Pacific Lamprey offspring from translocations to the Columbia River

  • Pages: 1531-1552
  • First Published: 12 June 2023

Impact statement

Restoration actions employing human transportation of fish are able to increase adult numbers of a culturally important species, Pacific Lamprey, to areas where they can be harvested by Columbia River Treaty Tribes; evidenced by genetic analysis to determine natal origins of individuals through their lifetimes (10+ years).

MANAGEMENT BRIEF

Salvage using electrofishing methods caused minimal mortality of burrowed and emerged larval lampreys in dewatered habitats

  • Pages: 1553-1566
  • First Published: 18 March 2023

Impact statement

Larval lampreys burrowed in freshwater habitats can become stranded and die when exposed to human-induced dewatering. Our results suggest salvage methods that use electrofishing can reduce the mortality that occurs with dewatering, especially when temperatures are elevated, supporting conservation of native lampreys.

SPECIAL SECTION: NATIVE LAMPREYS: RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION OF ANCIENT FISHES

The case for basinwide passage and habitat restoration for Pacific Lamprey in the Willamette River basin (Oregon, USA)

  • Pages: 1567-1583
  • First Published: 18 March 2023

Impact statement

We provide an up-to-date history of Pacific Lamprey harvest at Willamette Falls, Oregon. The species is ecologically and culturally important. Conservation-focused perspectives could be used in basinwide plans to increase and monitor lamprey abundance.

Transplantation of prespawn adult Sea Lampreys as an important restoration strategy

  • Pages: 1584-1595
  • First Published: 31 October 2023

Impact statement

Sea Lamprey is a migratory species native to the east coast of North America, and despite its negative impact to the Great Lakes, where it was accidentally introduced, it is an important part of the riverine and ocean ecosystems. The paper describes a way to help restore lost runs of Sea Lamprey.

Unlocking the genomes of formalin-fixed freshwater fish specimens: An assessment of factors influencing DNA extraction quantity and quality

  • Pages: 1596-1609
  • First Published: 27 July 2023

Impact statement

Contemporary sequence capture and short-read sequencing methods may facilitate inference of evolutionary relationships, population genetic structure, and other information relevant to fisheries management from formalin-fixed natural history collections as long as enough DNA of sufficient quality is recovered. We assessed extraction protocols for two ray-finned fishes and one lamprey, and determined factors likely to result in sequencing success.

Evaluation of Pacific Lamprey statoliths for age estimation across their life cycle

  • Pages: 1610-1622
  • First Published: 04 November 2023

Impact statement

Robust age estimates for anadromous Pacific Lamprey can be generated using information on the size of their statoliths, which are apatite concretions analogous to otoliths, combined with body length and collection river. However, it appears that statoliths cease growing after metamorphosis, limiting age estimation to early life stages prior to ocean entry.

Backpack electrofishing can be used to collect adult lamprey

  • Pages: 1623-1630
  • First Published: 13 April 2023

Impact Statement

We provide evidence that adult lamprey can be collected (for research or management purposes) by use of a backpack electrofisher and a group of netters in a wadeable stream. Furthermore, with one exception, the fish showed no obvious signs of injury or mortality from electrofishing.

Evaluating the viability of the use of T-bar and radiotelemetry tags on prespawn Arctic Lampreys

  • Pages: 1631-1647
  • First Published: 31 October 2023

Impact statement

We tested the efficacy of using radiotelemetry and T-bar anchor tags on Arctic Lampreys for future data collection. Our results provide insight on the use of these tag types as well as a maximum tag size standard for future field studies utilizing the radiotelemetry tagging of Arctic Lampreys. These tagging methods will be instrumental for collecting information on this species for informed subsistence resource management practices in Alaska.

Probiotics improve survival and growth of larval Pacific Lamprey in laboratory culture

  • Pages: 1648-1663
  • First Published: 08 October 2023

Impact statement

Pacific Lamprey is a traditional food of significance to Pacific Northwest Tribes, but populations have declined such that harvest is limited. Artificial propagation of lamprey can provide animals for supplementation of wild populations but growth and survival in the laboratory has been a limiting factor. This study shows that probiotics improve growth and survival of laboratory-reared larval lamprey, which will increase numbers available for outplanting for population supplementation.

Oxygen consumption of sexually mature adult, first-feeding larval, and yearling Pacific Lampreys

  • Pages: 1664-1672
  • First Published: 25 July 2023

Impact statement

Pacific Lamprey are a valued cultural resource for Native American tribes of the northwestern United States and provide critical ecosystem services. To protect these fish during transport and rearing, we studied the oxygen requirements of both sexually mature adults and larvae. Based on these experiments, we recommend that adult Pacific Lamprey always be transported in aerated containers with access to air at the top of the tank. Larvae can increase their oxygen requirements by over 50% during feeding. For this reason, care should be taken to insure adequate oxygen supply in no- or low-flow conditions, particularly during feeding.

ARTICLES

Biotic and abiotic factors that influence Walleye recruitment in stocked lakes in Michigan

  • Pages: 1673-1686
  • First Published: 07 November 2023

Impact statement

Walleyes are a recreationally important species and are currently stocked in many Michigan inland lakes. This study provides novel insight into the biotic and abiotic factors that influence Walleye recruitment in stocked lakes. Our findings will facilitate the Walleye stocking decision making of fisheries managers.

Open Access

Spatial and temporal overlap between hatchery- and natural-origin steelhead and Chinook Salmon during spawning in the Klickitat River, Washington, USA

  • Pages: 1687-1701
  • First Published: 07 August 2023

Impact statement

Pacific Salmon and steelhead hatchery programs provide important fishery and conservation benefits. We monitored interactions between hatchery and wild populations by tracking radio-tagged fish and their degree of actual physical overlap in space and time to better inform management and recovery of this critical resource.

Postrelease mortality of spring Chinook Salmon from a mark-selective recreational fishery in the Yakima River, Washington

  • Pages: 1702-1712
  • First Published: 06 November 2023

Impact statement

Our study estimated a postrelease mortality rate of natural-origin spring Chinook Salmon in the Yakima River fishery of 12% and provides fisheries managers with a tool to consider harvest opportunities for hatchery-origin fish while ensuring that impacts to natural-origin fish do not exceed a predetermined limit.

Open Access

Evaluating bycatch avoidance in the U.S. Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus fishery

  • Pages: 1713-1724
  • First Published: 18 August 2023

Impact statement

This study demonstrates a method to address the analytical challenge of detecting bycatch avoidance behavior and relative effectiveness for bycatch mitigation. Consideration of program objectives and external incentives is important in the interpretation of fishing behaviors when evaluating bycatch mitigation programs.

Angling party persistence and visitation in a recreational Lake Trout fishery: Relative influence of travel distance and fuel costs

  • Pages: 1725-1734
  • First Published: 19 September 2023

Impact statement

We followed individual Lake Trout angling parties for 14 years at a single access point fishery. Our findings showed greater travel costs primarily resulted in reduced visitation within years, with a smaller negative effect on persistence as anglers among years. Visitation to a fishery and persistence as anglers in a fishery are different features of travel costs.

Open Access

Sexual dimorphism in an invasive population of suckermouth armored catfish: Implications for management

  • Pages: 1735-1749
  • First Published: 19 September 2023

Impact statement

Suckermouth armored catfish have invaded freshwater ecosystems globally, prompting increasing interest in control of nonnative populations. We provide a model for predicting sex of individuals based on external features as a means of advancing existing or future control programs.

Open Access

Silver Carp herding: A telemetry evaluation of efficacy and implications for design and application

  • Pages: 1750-1764
  • First Published: 28 September 2023

Impact statement

Invasive Silver Carp are a nuisance to boat operators and a threat to native aquatic species. Harvest and/or removal is the fundamental control practice for addressing Silver Carp populations in North America. Herding stimuli is often used to aggregate fish into large schools to increase the efficiency of the capture process. However, little is known about the fine-scale relationship between herding stimuli gradients and fish herding behavior. This study represents the first attempt to understanding this relationship using tagged fish and stationary receivers on a closed population. Results can provide insight into working towards understanding the effective spatial coverage of herding stimuli, standardizing the speed of herding deployments, and optimizing cost efficiency in terms of boats, nets, and personnel required to meet management goals.

FEATURE ARTICLE

Effects of live-imaging sonar on Blue Catfish angler success, perception, and behavior

  • Pages: 1765-1771
  • First Published: 29 September 2023

Impact statement

Angler catch of Blue Catfish was not influenced by live-imaging sonar in this controlled experiment. However, there was evidence that the use of live-imaging sonar influenced angler perception and behavior.

ARTICLES

Open Access

Flow augmentation from off-channel storage improves salmonid habitat and survival

  • Pages: 1772-1788
  • First Published: 28 September 2023

Impact statement

There is growing interest in using novel approaches to offset human-caused impacts on freshwater ecosystems. One approach involves releasing water from off-channel storage directly into small, flow-impaired streams to benefit endangered fishes—especially during the driest times of the year. This study explores how one of these "flow augmentation" projects affects the habitat, prey, and survival of threatened salmon and steelhead in a small coastal California stream.

Low-level infection of parasitic copepods on Rainbow Trout does not affect vulnerability to angling or short-term survival following catch-and-release angling

  • Pages: 1789-1798
  • First Published: 29 September 2023

Impact statement

Gill lice can be unsightly and can influence how anglers perceive the quality of a fishery. We demonstrated that low-level infection of gill lice did not influence catch rates or survival of trout in a popular Rainbow Trout fishery. Thus, public education campaigns could increase angler satisfaction.

REVIEWER ACKNOWLEDGEMENT